Jeff Theisen, Dave Valant and Jill Naegle, three of the original members of Slightest Idea, go over their songlist at the Theisen home south of town. The band will perform a set or two during Bellevue’s Reunion on the River Saturday at Cole Park.
Jeff Theisen, Dave Valant and Jill Naegle, three of the original members of Slightest Idea, go over their songlist at the Theisen home south of town. The band will perform a set or two during Bellevue’s Reunion on the River Saturday at Cole Park.

Six original Bellevue bands will reunite Saturday at Cole Park for Reunion on the River

It may have been a direct result of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones – added with another wave of bands like the Who, Led Zeppelin, Creedence Clearwater Revival and the Doors, and a golden age of rock music was sweeping across the country in the late 1960s and early ‘70s.
That musical trend was quite obvious here in Bellevue back in those days, as live music poured out of garages and bars, with the sounds of bar chords and blues riffs wafting down the Mississippi River on most evenings.
Tom Sawyer would have loved it.
“There were a lot of bands in Bellevue – anywhere from 12 to 15 at one point - and they were all local high school kids like us,” said Jeff Theisen, a former member of “Slightest Idea,” a local band that was formed in 1969. “Everyone wanted to be in a band. It was the thing to do.”
Many of these former bands who played in the Bellevue area over 40 years ago will reunite this Labor Day weekend for an event called Reunion on the River II, which will feature six local bands playing live at Cole Park beginning Saturday, Sept. 5 beginning at 2 p.m. All proceeds will go to the Bellevue Community Club.
The musical event was organized by John Long of Bellevue, who also played in a local garage band many decades ago. The first Reunion on the River organized by Long in 2013, raised about $13,000, which was split between Bellevue and Marquette schools.
Bellevue’s Dave Valant, another member of Slightest Idea, which will play a live set Saturday, said it was a lot of work playing in a band, it was also quite fun.  
“We’d practice in what we called “The Pit,” the old house across from the Bellevue elementary school,” said Valant. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION


BAND LINE-UP
Reunion on the River II will take place at Cole Park  on Saturday, Sept. 5 starting at 2p.m. Several bands from past eras have volunteered to play music all afternoon and evening.  The event is being hosted by the Bellevue Community Club and food and beverages will be served. 
Bands include (3 p.m.) Sweetwater (Steve Sieverding, John Hinke, Bill Sieverding, and Denny Krueger); (4 p.m.): Hazenville Dust (Steve Haferbier, Steve Lucke, Dan Eggers, Gerry Kuhl, John Hinke); (5 p.m.): Devil’s Disciples (Jim Theisen, Steve Lucke, Dan Eggers, Steve Sieverding and Denny Krueger); (6 p.m.): Slightest Idea (Jeff Theisen, Carl Etting, Jeff Maroff, Dave Valant, Calvin Pannell, Jill Davids and Casey Yeager; (7 p.m.): Stone Heart (Mark Theisen, Bruce Kilburg and Steve Haferbier); and the (8 p.m.): Gypsy Pistols (Chris Bandy, Ken Kline, Dave Ripperger, Tim Lutz and Steve Krejci).

Archbishop Michael Jackels of the Dubuque Archdiocese sprinkled Holy Water in the new classrooms at Marquette High School last Thursday. The symbolic event signified that the work done on the new school was “In the name of God
Archbishop Michael Jackels of the Dubuque Archdiocese sprinkled Holy Water in the new classrooms at Marquette High School last Thursday. The symbolic event signified that the work done on the new school was “In the name of God

New Marquette High School rooms officially blessed by Archbishop

Archbishop Jackels joked that he felt a little bit like Radar ‘O Reilly from the classic television show M*A*S*H when he sat down at the Marquette intercom system to deliver his opening address.
It was all part of the official blessing of the new Marquette Catholic High School in Bellevue last Thursday, in which hundreds of parishioners, alumni and students lined the hallways of the new facility to watch the Archbishop sprinkle Holy Water in rooms and shake hands with those present.
According to Father Kruse of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, the blessing and ritual was a way to signify that the work done on the new school is “In the name of God.”
The new 7,200 square-foot high school, which is attached to the original 1957 high school opened for classed this week as the 2015-16 school year is now underway.
This is a very exciting time in Marquette's long history.  I am honored to have the opportunity to serve at a school with such deep traditions, a foundation in faith, and a vision for the future.  Our new building begins a new chapter but the story remains the same - Growth in Mind and Spirit,” said Principal Geoffrey Kaiser, who noted that classes at the new Marquette High School will begin on Aug. 24. He said many of the schools teachers, staff and alumni have volunteered much of their summer to prepare the new educational facility.
“Archbishop Jackels' blessing reminds us that each brick and brush stroke were added to create a center where God may use our hands to do His work,” said Kaiser.  “Every person who contributed to our vision has provided our students with the unique opportunity to be taught holistically.  In blessing every classroom, we remember that every student is important, that God is our focus, and that to serve God we all serve each other.”

AmeriCorps volunteer Mariah Everts of Wisconsin looks on while fellow workers Joe Garrison and Jake Williamson, both of Illinois, cut logs for a retaining wall along the new hiking trail located in the west part of the Dyas Unit at Bellevue State Park
AmeriCorps volunteer Mariah Everts of Wisconsin looks on while fellow workers Joe Garrison and Jake Williamson, both of Illinois, cut logs for a retaining wall along the new hiking trail located in the west part of the Dyas Unit at Bellevue State Park

AmeriCorps group building new hiking path at Bellevue State Park

Digging, cutting, hauling, measuring and working up a good sweat.
That’s what is happening at Bellevue State Park’s Dyas Unit south of town, as about a dozen AmeriCorps workers are currently constructing a new hiking trail near the west shelter house.
The volunteers are working under the direction of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources trails program. Members of the group hail from Wisconsin, Illinois, Wisconsin and even California.
“The trail we are constructing is 100 percent sustainable,” explained Joe Garrison, a teacher from Naperville, Illinois, who is working for the AmeriCorps Iowa program for the summer. “It is being designed for maximum erosion control and should require little to no maintenance.”
The new section of hiking trail, which is about eight-tenths of a mile, connects to an existing trail and snakes along the bluff, with a few breathtaking views of the Mississippi River. Run-off paths and hand-made retaining walls pepper the length of the trail through the thick wooded area.
“This is going to be a great addition to the state park,” said Pete Englund of the Iowa DNR Trail Program, who is overseeing the project. “We want to people to use this trail and see the work that has been done here. It’s one of the first like it in Iowa.”
The trail work started a few months ago and is expected to be completed by August 13, Englund noted. “The partnership with the AmeriCorps program is really great,” he said. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION

The proposed docking facility would be located near the Bob Ernst building and the old button factory.  The bank would be dozed back for more water space and additional room, minimizing concerns about conflicting traffic demands with commercial shipping.
The proposed docking facility would be located near the Bob Ernst building and the old button factory. The bank would be dozed back for more water space and additional room, minimizing concerns about conflicting traffic demands with commercial shipping.

Dock proposal now in hands of Army Corps

City leaders, as well as tourism and economic development officials in Jackson County have their fingers crossed.

Sometime in the next 90 days, word should be received by the Army Corps of Engineers on whether or not the City of Bellevue will be allowed to install a series of public boat docks and transient slips on the Mississippi River just below Lock and Dam 12.

The idea would be for recreational boats to be able to dock, and those aboard to come uptown and shop and eat. Boats would also be allowed to stay overnight.

The end result could mean added tourism and sales for downtown merchants and more overall traffic in this scenic river town.

An official application was unanimously approved by Bellevue City Council members last week and mailed to the Army Corps, along with a new design for the project created by IIW Engineers.

The total cost of the project would be about $1.4 million, which would be folded into the ongoing Parks to People initiative recently created by the State of Iowa. The project would be paid for through various grants, donations, with the city paying about 20 percent of the remaining portion, which could be accomplished through tax increment financing or general obligation bonds.

The new dock plan is an altered version of a design from 2010, when the push for public docks was first initiated. At that time, a Bellevue Dock Committee had been meeting regularly - and a private entity, Water Street Partners, owned by Bellevue’s Ernst family, had already paid $80,000 for the engineering work.

Lockmaster John J. Mueller of Bellevue is overseeing the Army Corps of Engineers maintenance crews as the major overhaul gets underway.
Lockmaster John J. Mueller of Bellevue is overseeing the Army Corps of Engineers maintenance crews as the major overhaul gets underway.

Bellevue's 90-ton lock gates being replaced

Bellevue’s Lock and Dam 12 is undergoing a major overhaul this summer.

Maintenance crews from the Army Corps of Engineers, Rock Island District, are in town with giant cranes, divers, engineers and heavy equipment in order to replace the lock’s original 1935 auxiliary gates, which have been in disrepair and leaking for several years now.

This week, the old gates are being removed and new refurbished gates will be gently placed by the Corp’s 300,000-ton crane on the giant pintel balls that are located at the river bottom. The equipment was floated in via construction barges and tows.

Oddly enough, the original 1935 gates are  being replaced with another set of gates which came from Lock and Dam 17 in New Boston, which are also 80 years old, but completely refurbished. They are 30 feet tall, 63 feet wide and weigh 90 tons each.

According to Bellevue Lockmaster John J. Mueller, replacing gates on the ever-flowing and massive Mississippi River can be a bit tricky, and a lot of preparation and safety measures had to be taken to make it a smooth process.

“We started this spring when we put in the new bulkhead slots on the upper side of the auxiliary gates, which allowed us to put in the bulkhead to block off the river from flowing in the chamber,” said Mueller. “Once the bulkheads were in place the water will be equalized so it is the same on both the upstream and downstream sides.”

After the river is blocked and the water equalized with the bulkheads (which weigh 48 tons), Army Corps maintenance crews will remove the old gates with the crane, after which divers will inspect the silt plate and removed debris and mud around the plate and pintel balls.

“This is something that needed to be done for a long time,” said Mueller, who noted similar work is underway at Lock and Dam 11 in Dubuque. “Essentially, the auxiliary gates are bolted shut and become part of the dam - unless for some reason, the chamber needed to be used. At least now they are no longer leaking.”

Lock and Dam 17, where the refurbished gates for Bellevue’s Lock and Dam 12 came from, will receive new gates. Locks 13 and 21 are also receiving maintenance as part of this year’s work by the Corps. Chambers at both will be de-watered, pumped and dried for inspections and repairs.

The American Queen, the mighty paddle steamship, which can hold nearly 450 passengers, comes through Bellevue several times each year and always turns a lot of heads.
The American Queen, the mighty paddle steamship, which can hold nearly 450 passengers, comes through Bellevue several times each year and always turns a lot of heads.

Bellevue man will pilot American Queen

Bellevue’s Mike Blitgen will pilot on the massice SS American Queen starting this season. The 1975 Bellevue graduate has worked on the river for decades.
Bellevue’s Mike Blitgen will pilot on the massice SS American Queen starting this season. The 1975 Bellevue graduate has worked on the river for decades.

Mike Blitgen, with his classic smile and positive disposition, will be slowing down to wave to folks in his hometown as he glides by on the Mississippi Queen this summer.
Blitgen, who was born and raised in Bellevue, has been named Captain of the famous SS American Queen, which is said to be the largest river steamboat ever built.
The ship was manufacturer 20 years ago and is a six-deck recreation of a classic Mississippi riverboat, built by McDermott Shipyard for the Delta Queen Steamboat Company.
Blitgen, son of  Richard and Marge Blitgen, will be piloting the massive steamship as it rolls up and down the Mighty Mississippi this summer, making several scheduled landings in the area starting late next month.
Stops in Dubuque are scheduled for July 23, July 29, Aug 6, Aug 11, Aug 19, Sept 3, Sept 9, Sept 17, Sept 23, Oct 1 and Oct 7; while stops in Clinton include July 22, Aug 5, Sept 2, Sept 16 and Sept 30.
A 1975 graduate of Bellevue High School, this will be Blitgen’s first season piloting the American Queen, but certainly not his first time piloting large vessels on the Mississippi. To READ MORE, CLICK ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT:

St. Donatus man reflects on service in WWII 70 after surrender of Japanese Empire

Vernon Weber of St. Donatus displays a photo of his seapleane tender, the USS Shelikof on which he served aboard during Pacific Theatres battles in World War II.
Vernon Weber of St. Donatus displays a photo of his seapleane tender, the USS Shelikof on which he served aboard during Pacific Theatres battles in World War II.

It was 70 years ago this coming summer when American and Allied military officers accepted the unconditional surrender of the Japanese Empire aboard the U.S.S. Missouri, formally ending World War II.

Vernon Weber, a 20 year-old St. Donatus farmboy-turned sailor was there with the massive United States Naval fleet during that historic moment in Tokyo Bay. He was aboard a seaplane tender called the U.S.S. Shelikof, on which he was stationed since he joined the war effort two years earlier.

Most sailors at Tokyo Bay, including Weber, were battle weary after two years on the water - but relieved they weren’t engaged in major combat initially anticipated by the Allies after the fall of Okinawa, which was the island gateway to Japan.

It was there that Weber and countless other U.S. soldiers and sailors experienced first-hand the suicidal Japanese resistance late in the war. Kamikaze airplane attacks killed tens of thousands of American sailors and did major damage to at least seven American battle carriers.

Now age 90, Weber still goes to the farm near St. Donatus to feed the family calves on occasion, but has plenty of time to reflect on his experiences in World War II. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT.

Marquette and Bellevue High Schools took part in the live portrayal of a fatal accident scene in which local emergency crews responded in real time. Above, Logan Schroeder finds Natalie Sullivan following the crash.
Marquette and Bellevue High Schools took part in the live portrayal of a fatal accident scene in which local emergency crews responded in real time. Above, Logan Schroeder finds Natalie Sullivan following the crash.

Bellevue's Operation Prom teaches valuable lessons on dangers of drinking and driving

Hundreds of bystanders witnessed a horrific multiple-vehicle accident at Bellevue High School last week in which several young prom goers were seriously injured.

One student was arrested for operating under the influence. One also died as a result of the crash.

It was all part of the Bellevue Fire Department’s “Operation Prom” event, in which student actors from both Marquette and Bellevue High Schools simulated what happens at a scene of a fatal crash.

While the students were acting, the response of local emergency crews and the harsh lessons learned were quite real.

The production was all part of Bellevue’s Prom weekend, held to open young student’s eyes to the dangers of drinking and driving, as well as texting while driving.

Bellevue Fire Chief Kent Clasen, who coordinated the important event, said 40 percent of the calls local officials responded to last year were motor vehicle accidents involving personal injuries.

“Many of these accidents involved bad choices and some resulted in fatalities,” said Clasen. “Remember, one bad decision when operating a motor vehicle could truly be your last -  or you may survive to live with the fact you were responsible for someone else’s death. What you are about to see is the result of three bad decisions that were made.

The first car in the fatal accident at Bellevue’s Operation Prom contained four high school students – a driver, a passenger in the front seat and two passengers in the back seat. The driver had been drinking.

The front seat passenger, a young lady, had been thrown through the windshield and was lying dead on the ground. The driver was injured slightly, and dazed, Rear seat passengers sustained serious injuries and were trapped in the vehicle.

Hundreds attended the Outdoor Way of the Cross service in St. Donatus on Good Friday. Above, the cross is carried past the stations to the old Chapel on the bluff overlooking the church and the community.
Hundreds attended the Outdoor Way of the Cross service in St. Donatus on Good Friday. Above, the cross is carried past the stations to the old Chapel on the bluff overlooking the church and the community.

WAY OF THE CROSS IN ST. DONATUS

The annual Outdoor Way of the Cross service took place in St. Donatus on Good Friday with hundreds attending the traditional march up the hill past the many stations to the old chapel above.

The Rev. Michael Podhajsky, who was named the new pastor of the church in July, led the event for the very first time. He and the parishioners recited prayers and bowed at each station, while guests and church members took turns carrying the large wooden cross.

Conducted for over 150 years, the outdoor stations used in the Way of the Cross ceremony were built by Father Flammang and are said to be the first of their kind in the United States. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT.

SIGNS OF BELLEVUE HISTORY

Brian “Beaver” Kueter works on the old neon sign from former Anchor Inn in Bellevue.
Brian “Beaver” Kueter works on the old neon sign from former Anchor Inn in Bellevue.

Beaver Kueter has an extensive array of signs and symbols from the local area

Brian Kueter, known to most as simply “Beaver,” has a wealth of local history at his Bellevue home that will bring back a lot memories for some.
Kueter, who has been collecting signs and memorabilia from gas stations, as well as farm and feed stores, has many pieces from the Bellevue and St. Donatus areas in his stash of over 200 artifacts.
He’s obtained the old DX sign from Front Street, a large shoe advertisement sign from Lucke Brothers, the 1961 Dri-Gas sign from Till’s Auto and just recently acquired the original neon-lit anchor from the old Anchor Inn.
“It needs some work to get the neon lights working again – so right now, I’m just cleaning it up a bit,” said Kueter at his garage and shop area behind his home on Jefferson Avenue. “I got from an old scrapper and was really excited to find it.”
The 1990 graduate of Bellevue High School who works at John Deere in Dubuque said that he has always been collecting something. He focused that collecting bug on signs, as well as a few other items of interest.
“I have the old ‘ding-ding’ system from the Car Wash too. You know, that sound it used to make when you pulled up to the pumps back in the day,” said Kueter. “I had it hooked up un my garage for a while so it would ding when someone came in the door.”
As well as local signs and memorabilia, Kueter and his wife Pam travel to swap meets and auctions searching for those special signs which strike his fancy. “It’s a fun and wholesome hobby and kind of interesting,” said Kueter, who also enjoys shows like American Pickers. “I don’t know why I like it, I just do.” READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT.

Scouts, parents, friends and relatives gathered around the Pinewood Derby track at the Bellevue American Legion Post last week to get a close-up look at all the racing action.
Scouts, parents, friends and relatives gathered around the Pinewood Derby track at the Bellevue American Legion Post last week to get a close-up look at all the racing action.

PINEWOOD DERBY ACTION:Bellevue scouts race sleek pinewood cars during annual event

About two dozen local Cub Scouts met last Sunday at the Bellevue American Legion Post to race their sleek handmade pinewood vehicles down a wooden track at the 2015 Pinewood Derby in Bellevue
The event also featured a large viewing screen, which displayed the races, times and winners, so parents, grandparents and friends of the young participants could easily watch the action.
"Everyone seemed to enjoy the derby, and it was definitely a good experience for the scouts," said Bellevue Cub Scout leader Denny Walgamuth of Pack 342, who helped plan the event for the Bellevue Scouts and was there to line up the cars at the start of each race.
The announcer and color commentator during the Pinewood Derby was none other than Garden Tractor Pullers Association President Bear Sieverding of Bellevue, who called each race and kept the crowd entertained and excited.
The many scouts, who made their own racers in accordance with Pinewood Derby rules, got to race their uniquely-painted pinewood vehicles four times, twice in each lane of the track.
In the end, Kempton Sikkema placed first for the fastest time in the Pinewood Derby, followed by Beau Walgamuth, Maverick Scheckel, Jason Wedeking, Trevor Haxmeier and Shane Kelchen.

Ben Hachmann of Hachmann Funeral Home of Bellevue is greeted by his new grief therapy dog, Sophie, who is a 6-month old Goldendoodle.
Ben Hachmann of Hachmann Funeral Home of Bellevue is greeted by his new grief therapy dog, Sophie, who is a 6-month old Goldendoodle.

Bellevue's Therapy Dog

Hachmann Funeral Home training young pooch for grief therapy program

A Goldendoodle canine who goes by the name of Sophie is the newest employee at Hachmann Funeral Home in Bellevue.
Currently in training for certification, Sophie is one of a growing number of grief therapy dogs working in funeral homes around the Midwest. The dogs help soothe grieving families in their time of loss.
According to funeral home director and owner Ben Hachmann, the canine is a cross between a Golden Retriever and a Poodle.
“We chose a Goldendoodle because it is one of the smartest dogs and interacts well with people,” said Hachmann. “They are able to detect people who need comfort.”
While Sophie seems to be a large dog, she is only six months old and will need to continue to be trained an additional three months or so before being ready to help grieving families.
K9 Comfort of Bellevue, owned and operated by Jason and Carrie Rowan, who acquired Sophie for Hachmann, is helping to train her.
“She’s really a community dog,” said Jason. “We’ll take her to nursing homes and other places like Hospice to visit. We’ve already taken her to Mill Valley and the reception was great. She can put a smile on your face.”
As well as her in-training visits around the Bellevue area, Sophie will make her debut public appearance at Hachmann Funeral Home’s Valentine Luncheon for widows this Friday afternoon at the Off-Shore Events Centre.
“As she gets older, she’ll really be an asset to the funeral home and the community,” said Hachmann, who noted that similar grief therapy dogs are already working at funeral homes in Maquoketa and Clinton. “There is no extra charge for the service, but it she may be a bright spot for youth and others when making arrangements. There’s always a bit of stigma when you come here after a close family member passes. And, if the families don’t want to use her that is their choice. We’ll just play it by ear.”
Hachmann noted that funeral homes allow family members and friends to gather in one place to say a last goodbye to loved ones. Although it can be an extremely somber occasion, a gentle Therapy Dog can be an asset during this time. They bring unconditional love and help to lighten a mournful atmosphere while bringing peace to individuals during an upsetting time.
Therapy Dogs have the ability to assist people with the grieving process. Their steady and unwavering companionship helps to provide consolation to family members while the effects of stroking the fur of a serene dog can be incredibly comforting.
According to research, the idea of therapy dogs started in World War II as a way of lifting the spirits of troops and the wounded. It was Dr. Mayo of Mayo Clinic fame who saw how a visiting soldier's dog lifted spirits and actually promoted the healing process among the wounded.

Randy Rubel, who found $880 in cash near Mill Valley, returned the money to its rightful owner, April Heacock last Friday at the Bellevue Police Station.
Randy Rubel, who found $880 in cash near Mill Valley, returned the money to its rightful owner, April Heacock last Friday at the Bellevue Police Station.

Mystery money claimed

$880 that has been found before Christmas returned to owner

The mystery of the unclaimed money found in Bellevue has officially been solved - and a few positive lessons were learned as well – such as the value of living in a small town with a lot of honest people.
Last week, Bellevue Police Chief Lynn Schwager, announced that a “significant amount of cash” was discovered within the city limits the week just prior to Christmas, and no one had called to make or report or try to claim it in several weeks.
At the time authorities would release no details concerning the discovery to the public so that the story of the owner and the finder would match, thus verifying the right person.
Last Friday morning that person came forward. It was April Heacock of Bellevue who works at Roeder Brothers Implement. A 2000 graduate of Bellevue High School, the young lady had been saving up some cash to go shopping for Christmas gifts.
She had $880 total in one-hundred dollar bills, as well as some twenty dollar bills.
She kept the cash in an envelope inside her purse and kept adding to it over the course of the year, until it was time to shop. When that time came, she couldn’t find it.
“The envelope must have fell out when I was walking to Mill Valley,” said Heacock, who regularly plays piano for the older residents there. She also performs for the folks at Sunrise Villa. “I retraced my steps and called around to the places I had been, but no one had seen it. I figured it was lost for good. I was pretty upset.”
The money, however, was not lost at all. It was picked up the week before Christmas by Randy Rubel, a semi-retired teacher for Marquette Catholic Schools.
“We live on 12th Street near Mill Valley and were out for a walk when we saw the envelope laying on the ground,” said Rubel. “I immediately turned it in at the Bellevue Police Station, and they told me to right down a description of it, where it was found and how much was inside.”
Authorities have been waiting for someone to claim the cash for about month, but no one had come forward, and there have been no reports of lost or stolen money in the area. Schwager said it was time to reach out the community and called the Herald-Leader.
“We saw the article in the newspaper and I knew that was probably it,” said her mother Donna Heacock, who went to the police station with her daughter Friday morning to meet the person who found the cash. “I think it is so nice to live in a small town with honest people.”
With the cash in hand at the police station, April gave Randy a big hug. With tears in her eyes, she also handed him $200 from the envelope as a reward and a thank you for finding it and turning it in.
“This is one of the most positive investigations I’ve ever experienced,” said Police Chief Schwager. “It is so great to have it turn out this way and see that we live in such a good small town.

John Mueller of Bellevue recently took the helm at Lock and Dam 12.
John Mueller of Bellevue recently took the helm at Lock and Dam 12.

 Bellevue man will oversee Lock and Dam 12 for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

John Mueller has been assigned the position of Lockmaster at Lock and Dam 12 in Bellevue by the U.S Army Corps of Engineers for the Rock Island District.
He succeeds William Hainstock of Maquoketa, who retired at the end of last year after serving 18 years here, with the past eight of them as Lockmaster. Hainstick had worked for the Army Corps of Engineers since 1988 in various roles.
Mueller, a longtime Bellevue resident is a native of Jackson County, growing up in La Motte. He previously served as Lockmaster at Lock and Dam 13 in Fulton, Illinois for three years before being reassigned here.
Mueller attended Holy Rosary School in La Motte during his elementary years and graduated from Marquette High School in Bellevue in 1978. He worked for the Bellevue Municipal Utilities as an electrical lineman for 10 years before becoming an electrician at Lock and Dam 12 in 1994.
He was promoted to Assistant Lockmaster here in 1999, serving until 2011, when he became Lockmaster in Fulton.
In his new role at Lock and Dam 12, Mueller will oversee operations, maintenance, safety and security. He is also currently coordinating the $2.5 million construction project of installing bulk head slots which is currently underway at the Bellevue location. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT

Peters Beef Genetics of Andrew a successful family operation

YOUNG MATHIAS PETERS conducts ultrasound tagging in a chute at the Peters Beef Genetics farm near Andrew.
YOUNG MATHIAS PETERS conducts ultrasound tagging in a chute at the Peters Beef Genetics farm near Andrew.

When it comes to cattle production, Charlie and Jenni Peters of rural Andrew know the business inside and out.
The family operation, Peters Beef Genetics, is quite well-known in the area. The local ag business consists of a purebred and commercial cow-calf herd, a bred heifer program, feedlot cattle and custom embryo program.
As well as the large cattle production business, the Peters family also has a crop and grain operation consisting of corn, soybeans, alfalfa and pasture.  The majority of the crop operation is used to provide feed for the cattle operation. 
According to patriarch Charlie Peters, his family has been raising cattle and farming for six generations around Andrew in Jackson County.
“We grew up with Simmental, Limousin and Angus cross cows and my parents, Floyd and Lavonne, began using artificial insemination in 1969 when the first Continental cattle were being imported from Europe,” explained Peters. “We also had a feedlot operation and as kids we exhibited cattle in 4-H and were involved in livestock judging.”
Jenni also has a strong cattle background. She grew up on a cow-calf operation in the Flints Hill of Kansas near Herington. Her family ran commercial cows and conducted custom embryo recipient work for Charolais and Angus breeders in Kansas.
Jenni and Charlie purchased their first purebred Angus cows in 1993 from Fink Angus and Gardiner Angus in Kansas.
In 1995, the couple also purchased a group of commercial heifers from Kent Andersen in Nebraska that has been the main base of their commercial cow herd. They started selling bred heifers in 1998.
“The first year we sold 40 head, all to one producer, and for our asking price. We thought, well this is easy, so the next year we bred 100 and it started from there,” said Charlie. “It didn’t take long to figure out it wouldn’t be that easy every year.”

This spring, Peters Beef Genetics will breed about 350 heifers. About half will sell at Tama Livestock and half will be sold in the local area of eastern Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois.
And keeping things local and being active in the community is important to the family. Charlie Peters is a hometown boy, graduating from Andrew Community School in 1983. Their four children each attended Andrew school through eighth grade and then attended Marquette Catholic High School in Bellevue.

Jacynda Smith, inventor of the new Tyme Curling Iron packages her new product for shipping in a garage behind Water Street Market.
Jacynda Smith, inventor of the new Tyme Curling Iron packages her new product for shipping in a garage behind Water Street Market.

New 'Tyme' curling iron created and patented by Bellevue siblings

Curling irons haven’t really changed much since the Titanic sank back in 1912.
Now that is all changing  – thanks to a group of Bellevue siblings, who have developed a new product they hope to sell nationwide in the coming months and years.
Jaycinda Smith, a hair stylist who invented the new “Tyme Iron,” along with her brothers Kierre Reeg and Kendrick Reeg, are currently packaging and shipping the fist batch of the unique curling irons this week in a garage behind Water Street Market.
The first shipment of the product has already been sold out, and more are on the way.
The new iron, which was invented, patented and brought to market over the past two years is a breakthrough in terms of operation and results. According to Smith, there is less heat damage to hair and it takes a lot less time to curl with the new Tyme Iron.
The new iron curls by heating and cooling the hair, while flat iron curls are created through heat and tension.
The new product is also designed with a “twist,” where other irons are straight or flat.
“With the Tyme, you can curl from top to the bottom instead of the bottom to the top – going from root to tip with ease and hardly any stress on the wrist,” said Smith, who styles hair at Centre Grove Suites in Dubuque. “This is due to the fact that the twist is in the iron itself and not the wrist.”
Smith has also found that when styling clients hair, her wrist feels much better using the Tyme iron as opposed to a flat iron, she has also found much more comfort when curling her own hair.
“With Tyme, you can achieve fuller big wavy curls too,” said Smith. “I have tried and cannot produce the same curls with any of my flat irons. It also retains moisture, leaves hair more shinier and luminous.”
Several demonstrations have taken place, including one recently at the Bronco Inn in Bellevue, where Smith received rave reviews for the product. A lot of orders were taken on the spot.

This 2010 concept of proposed transient boat docks for Bellevue’s downtown is similar to the latest plan, but would be located farther downstream away from Lock and Dam 12. The public docks are at the top of the list of priorities for future development.
This 2010 concept of proposed transient boat docks for Bellevue’s downtown is similar to the latest plan, but would be located farther downstream away from Lock and Dam 12. The public docks are at the top of the list of priorities for future development.

Public docks top wish list for Bellevue

The installation of a public boat docking system on the Mississippi River below Lock and Dam 12 turned up as the top priority for local leaders during a special joint meeting last Wednesday night.
Several entities, including of the City of Bellevue, the Bellevue Chamber of Commerce and Bellevue Economic and Tourism Association (BETA) joined together at the meeting to set goals and strategies in order for the community to increase tourism, shopping and economic development.
In a poll taken prior to the meeting, public docks came in with 59 votes, while a proposed Cole Park pool renovation came in first with 60 votes. New, public restrooms downtown came in third with 45 votes.
At the meeting, however, those present were more interested in pursuing the public docking system as the odds of making it a reality in the next year or two are higher than they were when the idea was first proposed over four years ago. READ MORE BY E-EDITION AT RIGHT

A team of scientists from Adventure: Mississippi River,” an annual education expedition which is part of the OAR Northwest Education series, are rowing the length of the Mississippi River collecting data and educating youth along the way.
A team of scientists from Adventure: Mississippi River,” an annual education expedition which is part of the OAR Northwest Education series, are rowing the length of the Mississippi River collecting data and educating youth along the way.

OAR Adventurers stop by Bellevue to teach students science of the river

Students at Bellevue Middle School and High School enjoyed a surprise assembly last Thursday morning when they were treated to a unique presentation by scientists collecting data during an expedition on the Mississippi River.
Greg Spooner and Patrick Fleming, adventures and part-time scientists with the “OAR Northwest Educational series,” docked their boats and equipment at the Department of Natural Resources station south of town around 10 a.m. and gave the presentation just minutes after leaving the water.
The adventurers captured the students’ attention immediately by blowing loudly through a seashell. After showing photos and videos of a recent excursion in the Atlantic Ocean, Spooner and Fleming explained what they were doing in the Mississippi River.
Spooner explained that their latest project, “Adventure: Mississippi River” (AMR) is an annual education expedition, part of the OAR Northwest Education series.

Pastor Paul Gammelin will lead a special worship service and celebration this Sunday as the congregation of St. John Lutheran Church marks 150 years.
Pastor Paul Gammelin will lead a special worship service and celebration this Sunday as the congregation of St. John Lutheran Church marks 150 years.

St. John Lutheran Church to celebrate 150 years

It was back in 1864 when18 early settlers of Bellevue, who originated from Pennsylvania, wanted to organize a Lutheran church here.
That church was established, and this Sunday, Oct. 12, St. John Lutheran Church of Bellevue will celebrate its 150th anniversary with a special service, meal and open house.
A worship service coordinated by Pastor Paul Gammelin, in conjunction with Bishop Micheal Burk, will begin at 10 a.m, followed by a meal, program and historical displays at Horizon Hall.
Folks are also invited tour the St. John Retreat Center and Rickert Lodge south of Bellevue after the meal and program. All are invited to attend the service and celebration.
“This sesquicentennial celebration is not about us, but rather it is about God and what God has accomplished through this congregation over the past 150 years,” said Pastor Gammelin. “This is also a time to remember the faithfulness of past members who committed themselves to doing God’s work in the community of Bellevue and throughout the world.”
“God has truly blessed this congregation over the years- and we have been and will continue to be a blessing to others,” Gammelin added. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION

Iowa governor Terry Branstad took to the podium in front of the State Capitol in Des Moines Monday morning to announce nearly $2 million for planning for implementation of a state park revitalization plan, which includes Jackson, Jones & Dubuque counties.
Iowa governor Terry Branstad took to the podium in front of the State Capitol in Des Moines Monday morning to announce nearly $2 million for planning for implementation of a state park revitalization plan, which includes Jackson, Jones & Dubuque counties.

Jackson County; Grant Wood Region selected for major parks revitalization plan

A large delegation of officials from Bellevue, Maquoketa and Jackson County descended on the State Capitol in Des Moines Monday morning for a big announcement on the future of parks and recreation in Jackson, Dubuque and Jones counties, which will include $1.9 million in start funding just for the planning stages.
Iowa Govorner Terry Branstad and Lt. Gov. Kim Reynolds were joined on the steps of the Capitol building by the Iowa Parks Foundation and the Green Ribbon Commission - a special commission charged with developing a long-term and sustainable strategy to revitalize Iowa's State Parks systems – to present the group’s 100 year strategy for Iowa parks to the public.
“We want to create a premiere park system in the state of Iowa that will rival the nation, and it will all begin in the Mississippi River Valley,” said Branstad, who formerly announced the strategy. “This will be a new dawn for the state park system.”
The Governor and Lt. Governor, in conjunction with the Iowa Parks Foundation, following the strategy outlined in the Commission's strategic plan, announced that the Grant Wood Mississippi River Region will be the location for the first strategic Iowa parks pilot project. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION

Dave Scheckel is pictured here on Mill Creek Road with 17 classic tractors he has restored over the decades.
Dave Scheckel is pictured here on Mill Creek Road with 17 classic tractors he has restored over the decades.

Scheckel has restored dozens of classic tractors

Dave Scheckel is fond of classic farm tractors. So much so, he’s got 17 of them stashed away at various locations around rural Bellevue.
From International Harvesters to Farmalls to John Deeres from the 1930s to the 1960s, Scheckel is the local master of tractor restoration.
He’s restored dozens of them for himself and others in his large machine shed and shop on Mill Creek Road, which is fully equipped with an entire kitchen, lounge and all the equipment needed for the job.
He and his wife Carol also regularly take part in tractor rides, tractor shows and tractor pulls across the tri-state area.
And, of course, Scheckel will be front and center at the next big tractor-related event, the Bellevue Horsemens Club’s annual Truck and Tractor Pull set for Friday, Aug. 1 up on the club grounds on the Bellevue-Cascade Road.
A thousand spectators or more are expected at the event, which has grown considerably over the decades. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT.

Gabriel Vasquez of Austin, Texas, (left) and Nic Doucette from Jefferson, Wisconsin, are spending 2.5 months kayaking 2,552 miles down the Mississippi River. The two were in Bellevue last Wednesday.
Gabriel Vasquez of Austin, Texas, (left) and Nic Doucette from Jefferson, Wisconsin, are spending 2.5 months kayaking 2,552 miles down the Mississippi River. The two were in Bellevue last Wednesday.

Marine vets kayak the Mississippi

Two United States Marine veterans who served in the First Marine Tank Battalion in both Iraq and Afghanistan were found kayaking through Bellevue last Wednesday morning.
Nic Doucette from Jefferson, Wisc. and Gabriel Vasquez of Austin, Texas, are spending 2.5 months kayaking 2,552 miles down the Mississippi River. 
Doucette departed at the Mississippi’s headwaters at Itasca State Park in Minnesota on May 31, with his destination of New Orleans and the Gulf of Mexico by late August. He was joined by fellow veteran Gabe Vasquez in Bemidji, Minn., on June 4.
During their stop at Lock and Dam 12 in Bellevue, the pair was 736.5 miles into the journey.
Their goal is to raise awareness and $25,000 for the Marine Semper Fi Fund, a nonprofit organization set up to provide immediate financial assistance and lifetime support for wounded, critically-ill and injured members of the U.S. Armed Forces and their families.
Doucette, who is now 27, spent four years in the Marines as a combat engineer in Iraq.
Last year, he came up with an idea of canoeing with some friends.
“I wanted to do a big trip,” he said. “I was bored. I wanted to do something big and exciting again.”
As for the Semper Fi Fund, a fellow Marine who Doucette deployed with had lost both his legs to an  improvised explosive device (IED).
“I wanted to make the trip meaningful too, so I contact the Semper Fi Fund to help military families,” explained Doucette. “
Doucette announced his journey on social media that he was kayaking the Mississippi River alone. Vasquez contacted him immediately.
“I said I’m coming with you,” said Vasquez, 27, of Austin, Texas, who spent eight years in the Marine Corps, with tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. “I’m dealing with my own problems from my deployment, and when I learned about the Semper Fi Fund, I decided it was the right thing to do.”
In Bellevue, members of American Legion Post #273 treated the young veterans to breakfast and helped the, restock supplies.
“Everyone along the way has just been great so far,” said Vasquez. “People learn about what we are doing and invite us into their homes for showers, meals and laundry.

David Eischeid poses for a photo at his art studio above the Great River Gallery.
David Eischeid poses for a photo at his art studio above the Great River Gallery.

Eischeid Grand Marshal of Heritage Days Parade

Dave Eischeid has been the face of creativity and art to several generations in the community of Bellevue, teaching art, ceramics and photography for 33 years, as well as volunteering his time and talent to countless worthwhile causes.

 

This year, Eischeid will also become the face of Heritage Days, as he has been named Grand Marshal of the 52nd annual event, which gets underway tonight with the Queen Contest at Bellevue High School.

 

Eischeid, who will be featured as Grand Marshal of the Heritage Days Parade on Friday morning July 4 at 10 a.m., will ride on the Bellevue Arts Council float, as he requested that the local organization be incorporated upon being asked to lead the event.

 

“There are so many other deserving people who could be named Grand Marshal, it is humbling to be honored in this manner,” said Eischeid, who was an instrumental part of forming the Bellevue Arts Council several years ago.

 

Eischeid has spent most of his life dedicated to art.  Originally from Cresco, he graduated from Loras College in Dubuque in 1967 with a Bachelors degree in art and a minor in education.  

 

He went on to achieve his Masters degree at the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls in 1974. 

 

Eischeid and his wife Carol have lived in Bellevue since 1967. While he served as an art teacher in the public school district for several decades, the couple also still started ... READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT

 

 Halle Heim, Little Miss Rodeo for 2014, is interviewed bv Ken Peiffer of WJOD
Halle Heim, Little Miss Rodeo for 2014, is interviewed bv Ken Peiffer of WJOD

Little Miss Rodeo and Junior Cowboy named

Maverick Duesing - 2014 Junior Cowboy.
Maverick Duesing - 2014 Junior Cowboy.

The JacksonCounty Pro Rodeo kicked off last Wednesday evening at the Off Shore Bar and Grill where local youngsters competed for the titles of Little Miss Rodeo and Junior Cowboy.

 

The kick off had entertainment provided by the Matt McPherson band and 103.3 WJOD. Popular disc jockey Ken Peiffer was the host of the event, during which he announced Halle Heim had earned the title for Little Miss, while Maverick Duesing was named Junior Cowboy. FOR MORE RODEO PHOTOS CLICK ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT.

 

 

 

Tim O'Connell of Zwingle, the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association’s Bareback Bronc Riding Rookie of the Year, will be one among dozens of professional rodeo stars at this year’s Jackson County Pro Rodeo slated this weekend at the Bellevue Horsemen’s Cl
Tim O'Connell of Zwingle, the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association’s Bareback Bronc Riding Rookie of the Year, will be one among dozens of professional rodeo stars at this year’s Jackson County Pro Rodeo slated this weekend at the Bellevue Horsemen’s Cl

Jackson County Pro Rodeo set June 19-21

“Whiplash the Cowboy Monkey,” recent star of the nationwide Taco John’s television commercials, will make another appearance at the Jackson County Pro Rodeo - a great show that has become a fan favorite.
“Whiplash the Cowboy Monkey,” recent star of the nationwide Taco John’s television commercials, will make another appearance at the Jackson County Pro Rodeo - a great show that has become a fan favorite.

When it comes to wholesome summer family fun, it doesn’t get much better than taking in the local rodeo, which is slated this year Thursday through Saturday, June 19-21. In fact, the Jackson County Pro Rodeo is ranked one of the top five small rodeos in the United States by the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) and folks from across the Midwest come to enjoy the unique three-day event, which is filled with cowboys, cowgirls, food, music and country-fied fun. The Pro Rodeo runs for three evenings at the Bellevue Horsemen’s Club arena and grounds west of Bellevue just off the Bellevue-Cascade Road. Gates open at 5 p.m. each evening with rodeo action beginning at 7:30 p.m. This year, the rodeo is celebrating its 27th year, in conjunction with the 52nd year of the Bellevue Horseman’s Club, whose members organize the annual event, which draws thousands to its arena outside Bellevue. Families bring their lawn chairs and blankets to line the hill at the Bellevue Horseman’s Club, overlooking the arena and listening to veteran announcer Roger Mooney. Following a kick-off party Wednesday, Thursday is a great night to bring the whole family, because it’s Children’s Night. The first 300 youngsters to come to the Rodeo that night will get a free T-Shirt, sponsored by the Off Shore Bar and Grill. There’s also a free Kid’ Coral each night, which features free Pony Rides, face-painting and more. There will Muttin Bustin’ all three nights just prior to intermission as well as a huge fireworks show each night following all the amazing the rodeo action. Events like steer wrestling and team roping test practical ranching skills, drawing on the county’s rich cattle-breeding tradition. Bernard, Iowa’s Three Hills Rodeo provides stock locally and for rodeos around the nation.

Bellevue City Clerk Janet Callaghan shows off her collection of Heritage Days Buttons that date back to the early 1960s.
Bellevue City Clerk Janet Callaghan shows off her collection of Heritage Days Buttons that date back to the early 1960s.

Heritage Days Button Collection

Callaghan has every button dating back 50 years

NEW BUTTONS are now on sale for the 2014 Bellevue Heritage Days Celebration. Available at most local business, the buttons cost $5 and serve as admission for most events and activities.
NEW BUTTONS are now on sale for the 2014 Bellevue Heritage Days Celebration. Available at most local business, the buttons cost $5 and serve as admission for most events and activities.

Janet Callaghan has a lot of history on her desk up at Bellevue City Hall.
That history comes in the form of buttons – Heritage Days Buttons that is - which the longtime City Clerk has been collecting for some time now.
Each Heritage Day button is in the collection dating back to the first celebration back in the early 1960s. Back then, it was called “Bellevue Homecoming.”
With the release and distribution of the 2014 Heritage Days Buttons this past Friday, Callaghan’s collection was updated once more.
“I got a lot of the older ones when I went to the Marvin Koppes auction a few years back,” said Callaghan, who is also a longtime member of the Heritage Days Committee. “It was hard to find the originals – there’s only a few other people who have them all.”
Callaghan said her two favorite Heritage Days buttons are those from 1977 “Hats off to Bellevue” and one of the Ski Bellevue Waterski team from 1998.
The Heritage Days buttons are not only collectible – the purchase of a button gains one admission to all the various events – from the Queen Contest to the Parade to the Fireworks to the big dance.
This year’s celebration will take place Thursday and Friday, July 3 and 4 and will include D&B Carnival Amusement Rides both days.
The Heritage Days Queen Contest will take place Thursday evening at 6:30 p.m. at Bellevue High School.
The legendary Razor Ray Theisen will play for a dance at the Bellevue American Legion Thursday night at 7:30 p.m. as well.
At 8 p.m. to midnight, an outdoor dance and bash will take place at Cole Park featuring the Dingleberries, with opening act 5th Fret.
At 8:30 p.m., a flag disposal ceremony will be conducted at Cole Park by the Bellevue American Legion Post #273.
On Friday, July 4, the day begins at 10 a.m. with the massive and amazing Heritage Days Parade, with parade line-up at the Horizon Hall parking lot at about 9:15 a.m.
A flag-raising ceremony conducted by the Bellevue Fire Department will take place at Cole Park after the parade. Food stands, bingo, childrens games and a beer garden will be open all day. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION

Dave and Ann Kendall of rural Bellevue check the progress of the eight acres of strawberries at their farm on Mill Creek Road.
Dave and Ann Kendall of rural Bellevue check the progress of the eight acres of strawberries at their farm on Mill Creek Road.

Strawberry Fields Forever

Crops at Annie’s Acres in bloom; strawberry season underway

The smell of sweet, ripe strawberries can be intoxicating – and the strawberry fields at Annie’s Acres northwest of Bellevue are well on their way to turning out tens of thousands of the irresistible pieces of fruit.
In just another two to three weeks Dave and Ann Kendall, owners of Annie’s Acres, will start the seasonal process of picking the strawberry fields now in full bloom on Mill Creek Road.
With about eight acres which produce about 80,000 pounds, the flowers at Annie’s Acres are quickly growing into the tasty fruit.
“Each flower will be a strawberry and they’re really starting to open – so it won’t be long now,” said Dave Kendall, who created Annies Acres back in 1987.
“We started growing strawberries back during the 1980s farm crisis as a way to help pay the bills. We started with a couple acres and have quadrupled our production since then.”
Strawberries from Annie’s Acres are sold all over eastern Iowa, from major grocery stores in Dubuque, to farmer’s markets in Maquoketa and Clinton. Here in Bellevue, Annie’s Acres strawberries will be sold fresh at 101 North Riverview, near Lock and Dam 12 starting around June 15.
Many local folks also enjoy the scenic drive down Mill Creek Road on their way to pick their own.

Bellevue’s Steines and Griebel Logging ships high quality hardwoods around the world

LOG LOADER: Last Wednesday morning, Orville “Junior” Steines and partner Keith Griebel, owners of Steines and Griebel Logging, loaded up a semi-truck at their shop north of town with a load of Walnut that was valued at over $35,000.  The wood was on its w
LOG LOADER: Last Wednesday morning, Orville “Junior” Steines and partner Keith Griebel, owners of Steines and Griebel Logging, loaded up a semi-truck at their shop north of town with a load of Walnut that was valued at over $35,000. The wood was on its w

While Steines & Griebel Logging has been around for well over 50 years now, many in the local community may not be aware that the longtime multi-generational Bellevue business is serving a world market with some of  the best hardwood logs available.
In fact, last week Orville “Junior” Steines and partner Keith Griebel, owners of Steines & Griebel Logging, Inc., loaded up another container at their shop north of town with a load of high quality veneer Walnut logs. This load of veneer Walnut logs was on its way to Switzerland to be sliced into high end veneer panels and furniture.
 “Most of our product comes within a 70 mile radius of Bellevue,” said Junior. “We have  some of the best walnut  in the world and some very good quality oak as well right here. Although we have operated in several surrounding states as well, travel has never been an issue. The timber is good because the soil quality is good.”
The hardwoods logged by Steines & Griebel  can be found in products across the nation as well as world wide, from fine furniture and high end architectural veneers, to products many would not even think about.
 “Mercedes and other top end car companies use many types of veneer for their dashboards, consoles, steering wheels and other fixtures. Walnut is used as well in high quality gun stocks and pistol grips- a lot of high dollar products. Our walnut trees in the Upper Midwest have the best quality of any in the world,” explained Keith. “Many of our White Oak logs have been used for whiskey and wine barrels in Kentucky since the business originated in 1960 and they are still making them today. Wood makes better whiskey and wine than plastic does” READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT.

Justin Harms and Mike Valant worked to assembled the new 16 x 40-foot practice dock that arrived here from a company called Tiger Docks in St. Louis, Missouri last week. The dock, which was custom-designed to hold 30 skiers at once on the take-off side, w
Justin Harms and Mike Valant worked to assembled the new 16 x 40-foot practice dock that arrived here from a company called Tiger Docks in St. Louis, Missouri last week. The dock, which was custom-designed to hold 30 skiers at once on the take-off side, w

New equipment will allow for bigger and safer water shows

Ski Bellevue Practice Dock

Members of the Ski Bellevue Waterski Team spent last Saturday afternoon assembling a new 16 x 40-foot practice dock that arrived here from a company called Tiger Docks in St. Louis, Missouri.
The dock, which was custom-designed to hold 30 skiers at once on the take-off side, was trucked in pieces and assembled on property which is owned by Bellevue Sand and Gravel, long-time supporters of Ski Bellevue.
The owner of Bellevue Sand and Gravel, John Schneider, unloaded the dock parts from the truck for the team and loaned other equipment to assist in assembly.
“With the high water it was the perfect time to construct the dock, then float it down to the team's practice site,” explained Dave Valant of Ski Bellevue, who was on the site overseeing the assembly. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT.

Black smoke clouds could be seen from miles away.
Black smoke clouds could be seen from miles away.

Fire at Bullock's Ag Service in La Motte

Bellevue Fire Chief Kent Clasen directs fire fighters.
Bellevue Fire Chief Kent Clasen directs fire fighters.

La Motte, Bellevue, Andrew, Bernard, Key West and Maquoketa fire departments were called to a large fire at Bullock Ag Services in LaMotte Thursday morning at approximately 8:15 a.m. According to officials the center section of the storage facility caught fire and fire fighters spent several hours on the scene. Thick black smoke could be seen from the top of the bluff as far away as Bellevue. The cause of the fire remains under investigation. Look for more photos and information in next week’s Herald-Leader.

 

Hundreds attended the Outdoor Way of the Cross service in St. Donatus on Good Friday. Above, the cross is carried past the stations to the old Chapel on the bluff overlooking the church and the community.
Hundreds attended the Outdoor Way of the Cross service in St. Donatus on Good Friday. Above, the cross is carried past the stations to the old Chapel on the bluff overlooking the church and the community.

Way of the Cross

150 year-old tradition continues in St. Donatus

The Reverend Jerry Blake facilitated the service and recited prayers at each station, while guests took turns carrying the large wooden cross.
The Reverend Jerry Blake facilitated the service and recited prayers at each station, while guests took turns carrying the large wooden cross.

The annual Way of the Cross service took place in St. Donatus last Friday with hundreds attending the traditional march up the hill past the many stations to the old chapel above.
The Reverend Jerry Blake facilitated the event and recited prayers and bowed at each station, while guests and church members took turns carrying the large wooden cross.
Conducted for over 150 years, the outdoor stations in the Way of the Cross ceremony were built by Father Flammang and are said to be the first of their kind in the United States.
According to a book entitled the ‘Story of St. Donatus,’ the inspiration for this project was conceived by the great Jesuit missionary and author, Father Francis Xavier Weniger, while conducting a mission in St. donates parish in 1852.
At the beginning of the mission, according to his customary practice, he had a huge cross, 40 or 50 feet in height, erected in the most prominent place of the community, namely the hill behind the cemetery. The erection of a mission cross was very impressive according to Hoffman who gives the following description of such a ceremony.
“At this public gathering soldiers from nearby garrisons were invited to participate in the processions; the town common, often used by the local authorities in those days for civic and regional celebrations, was pressed into service to fire salutes at the erection of the outdoor mission cross. After this ceremony the zealous missioner suggested to the congregation the idea of erecting the stations on the hill as a “fitting path to that symbol of our Redemption.” READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT.

Major effort to fill Bellevue’s downtown storefronts

FBLA CHAMPIONS: Left to right are Madeline Lyons (Senior), Allison Kilburg (Senior), Dalton Stephany (Junior), Josh Sieverding (Junior), Alex Hinke (Junior)
FBLA CHAMPIONS: Left to right are Madeline Lyons (Senior), Allison Kilburg (Senior), Dalton Stephany (Junior), Josh Sieverding (Junior), Alex Hinke (Junior)

Bellevue’s Fab Five

Local FBLA Chapter headed to Nationals

Five members of the Bellevue Chapter of the Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) are headed to the organization’s National Conference this June in Nashville, Tennessee.
This, after 16 students from Bellevue FBLA competed in various business-related events against 695 other high school students at the State Leadership Conference the last weekend in March.
Those five walking away as top finishers included Josh Sieverding, who took first place in Spreadsheet Applications; and Dalton Stephany, who finished second place in the same category.
The team of Allison Kilburg, Madeline Lyons and Alex Hinke placed second in Business Ethics; while Josh Sieverding also took home third-place honors in the category of Business Calculations. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION.

Bellevue Fire Fighters fight a boat fire at 32671 Smith's Ferry Road.
Bellevue Fire Fighters fight a boat fire at 32671 Smith's Ferry Road.

Boat fire causes big blaze at Smith’s Ferry

The Bellevue Fire Department responded to a boat on fire Monday, March 31 at 32671 Smith’s Ferry Road north of Bellevue approximately 4:38 p.m.
When fire crews arrived they found the small boat fully engulfed in flames. Fire fighters spent over 30 minutes putting out the blaze, which was intense due to the large amount of fuel on board. Crews utilized a special foam mixture to eventually snuff out the fire.
The boat’s owner, Tom Kunnert of Dubuque, told officials that he was charging the batteries and shortly thereafter noticed the boat was on fire. He added that he had just filled the boat with fuel as he was planning to fish on the Mississippi River that afternoon.
The boat and its motor are a total loss. The boat, which was insured, had an esti

Rick Klemme and his wife Joan are marking nearly one year since Rick underwent a double lung transplant. They are encouraging local residents to get on the donor registry.
Rick Klemme and his wife Joan are marking nearly one year since Rick underwent a double lung transplant. They are encouraging local residents to get on the donor registry.

Bellevue man recovering from lung transplant; stresses importance of organ donation

Bellevue’s Rick Klemme wants the public to know the importance of organ donation.
In fact, if it wasn’t for the National Donor Registry, he may not be alive today.
Klemme underwent a double lung transplant at the University of Wisconsin in Madison last spring and continues recover from the procedure.
Since the surgery on May 23, 2013, he has to be careful about being in public places with a lot of people, and sometimes has to wear a respiratory mask to protect himself against germs.
Back at his home in the Cheney-Wagner addition, Klemme and his wife Joan are thankful for the success of the surgery and are encouraging others to place their names on the Iowa Donor Network so other lives may be saved.
“April is National Donate Life Month, so we thought this would be a good time to make people aware of how important it is to save a life through organ donation. One donor can save up to eight lives,” said Rick

Coats for Kids campaign to help needy in Kosovo

Iowa National Guardsman Steve Moellers of Bellevue is pictured here inside a Black Hawk helicopter in Kosovo. (photo courtesy Moeller family)
Iowa National Guardsman Steve Moellers of Bellevue is pictured here inside a Black Hawk helicopter in Kosovo. (photo courtesy Moeller family)

Bellevue native and Iowa National Guard soldier Steven Moellers, who is currently stationed in Camp Bondsteel in Kosovo, is asking the local community to help the needy in that country.
Moellers, a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter mechanic arrived in Kosovo in January on his first deployment overseas. His unit’s mission is to ensure that peace is kept within the territory. He is also spearheading a project to help the less fortunate in the developing country, which was formerly part of Serbia.
Moellers, in conjunction with National Guard veteran Chuck Kueter and Bellevue American Legion Post #273, are collecting coats and school supplies for the children and families of Kosovo, who were devastated by years of conflicts, attacks and a struggling economy.
The drive has been dubbed “Coats for Kids,” and a similar program was conducted in 2007 and 2008 when Kueter was also stationed in Kosovo.
After hearing about what Chuck did when he was deployed over here, I knew I would like to get it going again to help the people of Kosovo,” explained Moellers.
Those who wish to donate coats and school supplies should drop them off at Bellevue City Hall from now through April 11. Monetary donations are also need to help pay for shipping costs.
When the coats and supplies arrive, Moellers, will help distribute them to the needy.
READ MORE by purchasing an e-edition.

Tim Till, Ardell “Bud” Till and Steve Till, the third and fourth generations of the Till family, are marking 100 years in car and truck business in Bellevue. The dealership was created by Bud’s grandfather, J.J. Till.
Tim Till, Ardell “Bud” Till and Steve Till, the third and fourth generations of the Till family, are marking 100 years in car and truck business in Bellevue. The dealership was created by Bud’s grandfather, J.J. Till.

Till's celebrates 100 years in Bellevue

This advertisement announcing that J.J. Till has secured a local auto agency appeared in the March 17, 1914 edition of the Bellevue Herald.
This advertisement announcing that J.J. Till has secured a local auto agency appeared in the March 17, 1914 edition of the Bellevue Herald.

In 1914, the automobile industry was exploding across America.
Henry Ford’s assembly line concept had made the American auto affordable to the masses while wages for autoworkers doubled from $2.40 per day to $5 per day that same year. Other car manufacturers such as Buick and Chevrolet followed suit and the country was quickly becoming mobile.
Here in Bellevue, the auto industry was kicking into high gear as well, as evidenced by the March 10, 1914 Bellevue Herald, which featured several advertisements annwouncing the opening of auto dealerships in Jackson County.
Among the most prominent was an advertisement was for Joseph J. Till of Bellevue. The ad read “Joseph J. Till has secured the local agency for the following 1914 cars: Imperial, Buick, Ford and Studebaker. Anyone wanting a car should place their order early as there is sure to be a great demand for cars.”
A century later, Till’s Auto is still in business and still owned by the Till family who are celebrating 100 years of serving customers across Jackson County and beyond. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT:

Gary Roeder (center) is pictured here with sons Nick and Scott Roeder.
Gary Roeder (center) is pictured here with sons Nick and Scott Roeder.

Roeder Brothers, Inc. purchases Daque Equipment

A longtime Bellevue business is expanding its market in eastern Iowa and beyond.
Roeder Brothers Inc. of Bellevue, an agriculture equipment and parts dealer serving the eastern Iowa area for over 70 years, has purchased Dague Equipment in Maquoketa.
The sale, which was effective Monday, added a second major location in Jackson County for Roeder Brothers, a Massey-Ferguson dealership, which also offers many other farm equipment brands including AGCO, Bobcat, Demco, Kuhn and Featherlite.
“We are excited to have Dague Equipment, Inc. as part of our Roeder Brothers, Inc. family,” said Scott Roeder, who added that both locations will continue to provide reliable, family-friendly sales, parts, and service expertise which customers have come to value from both Roeder Brothers and Dague Equipment teams. “Having two locations will add better service and more convenience for parts and customer service.”
Roeder Brothers Inc. began in 1938 with the Roeder brothers, Harry, Floyd and Kenneth Roeder in Bellevue.
The family-owned operation is a third-generation business now owned by Scott and Nick Roeder. READ MORE BY CLICKING ON E-EDITION AT TOP RIGHT...

Twenty-five fire fighters from Bellevue responded along with 15 fire fighters from Preston and Springbrook during last Thursday’s call to the Bellevue Fire Station. No one was injured, but two trucks and a rescue boat were damaged.
Twenty-five fire fighters from Bellevue responded along with 15 fire fighters from Preston and Springbrook during last Thursday’s call to the Bellevue Fire Station. No one was injured, but two trucks and a rescue boat were damaged.

Bellevue Fire Fighters save own building from destruction

Fire fighters from Preston and Springbrook responded to the call.
Fire fighters from Preston and Springbrook responded to the call.

Fire fighters responded to a fire call at the Bellevue Fire Station Thursday morning at approximately 6:50 a.m. When responders arrived, a thick cloud of smoke was billowing out of the station.
Bellevue Police Chief Lynn Schwager, whose office is next door at City Hall, first spotted smoke coming from the rafters. While some of the volunteers battled the flames, which appeared to originate from the northwest end of the building, others rushed to remove trucks, racks of protective gear and other equipment.
A handful of Bellevue residents reported seeing smoke from several blocks away, including former Mayor Virgil Murry and Mike Hurley, who took a photo from his upstairs window just west of the fire station looking east.
Damage estimates to the building are not yet known, but look to be mostly soot and smoke damage. The department’s rescue boat was also damaged by the heat, as well as minor damage to two trucks. The building itself appears to have sustained minimal damage.
The fire was quickly extinguished, smoke was cleared and vehicles and equipment were moved into the street. Preston, Maquoketa and Springbrook Fire Departments were also called to the scene for back up.
State Street and Third Street were blocked with fire trucks and emergency vehicles for several hours. FOR MORE, CLICK ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT.

Ski Bellevue gearing up for 2014 season

Members of the Ski Bellevue Waterskiing Team conducted dryland practice drills in the Bellevue Elementary gymnasium over the weekend, utilizing ropes attached the the walls. Above, Makaela O'Donnell and Isabella Penniston balance on the shoulders of Lexy
Members of the Ski Bellevue Waterskiing Team conducted dryland practice drills in the Bellevue Elementary gymnasium over the weekend, utilizing ropes attached the the walls. Above, Makaela O'Donnell and Isabella Penniston balance on the shoulders of Lexy

While the snowflakes fell outside on a frozen river last Saturday, just a few blocks away, the Ski Bellevue Waterski Show Team conducted it’s first “dryland practice” of 2014 at the old Bellevue Elementary School gymnasium.
It’s all part of the intense preparation for another exciting season on the water, as Ski Bellevue is one of only four waterski show teams in the state of Iowa and the only one performing on the Mississippi, which takes even more skills and talent.
“It is the way our ski team practices before we do our stuff on the water,” said Dave Valent, one of the main organizers of the famous Ski Bellevue shows. “We’ve got several shows lined up for this summer, so we need to be prepared.”
During dryland practice, ski ropes are attached to the gymnasium wall instead of a boat.
In this way, the team can practice pyramid building along with lots of other acts that make up a ski show. READ MORE BY PURCHASING AN E-EDITION.

Dave North, President and CEO of Sedgwick Claims Management Services, works in his Bellevue office
Dave North, President and CEO of Sedgwick Claims Management Services, works in his Bellevue office

Sedgwick CMS purchased for $2.4 billion

Bellevue’s Dave North was busy on the phone with financial reporters from the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times last Monday, just hours after the news broke that Sedgwick Claims Management Services, Inc., a top provider of insurance claims processing, would be purchased by KKR (Kolberg, Kravis, Roberts).
The private equity giant agreed to purchase a majority ownership of the company for $2.4 billion from its current group of investors, which includes Hellman & Friedman LLC and Stone Point Capital LLC.
North, who is president and CEO of Sedgwick, which employs 42 people at its Bellevue location, said that the news was great for the company and that nothing would change in terms of Bellevue.
“There is no change in our commitment to Bellevue or offices in Iowa,” said North. “This is an investor change that brings a new depth of resources to Sedgwick for future growth.”
Sedgwick Claims Management Services, Inc. is a leading provider of technology-enabled claims and productivity management solutions.
At Sedgwick’s Bellevue location, which has been in operation for over two years, employees often manage claims for long term disability claims and specializes in leaves of absences for large employers across the country.

Image from the Baldwin Bank Security Camera
Image from the Baldwin Bank Security Camera

Police searching for Baldwin Bank Robber

Today, (Friday, Jan. 31) at 9:11 a.m. the Jackson County Sheriff's Office received a call that the Baldwin bank had been robbed by a male subject.  The subject is between 5'10" and 6'0" and possibly wearing a fake beard.  Police say the subject drove off in a white colored older truck with a red stripe heading southbound on 50th Avenue.
If you see vehicle or subject please call the Jackson County Sheriff's Office at 563/652-3312

Melissa Roeder and Tonya Roeder give test out some of the equipment at their new venture called On Track Fitness.
Melissa Roeder and Tonya Roeder give test out some of the equipment at their new venture called On Track Fitness.

On Track Fitness Center to open in Bellevue

A new business is opening in Bellevue which will serve the community with a healthy dose of workout and fitness equipment options.
“On Track Fitness,” created by Melissa Roeder and sister-in-law Tonya Roeder, is located right on the railroad tracks at 306 North Second Street, which is the former home of the Achen car dealership.
The Roeder ladies will host a public open house to show off the new Bellevue fitness center on Thursday, Jan. 30 from 6 to 8 p.m.; Friday, Jan. 31 from 5 to 7 p.m.; and Saturday, Feb. 1 from 9 a.m. to noon.
Inside, patrons will find a newly remodeled workout area with dozens of pieces of high quality, state-of-the-art workout equipment, big screen televisions and a wall of new lockers for members. READ MORE BY CLICKING on E-EDITION.

Bellevue's Historic Elementary School

The Bellevue Elementary School, which once served as the county courthouse, may be the oldest school building still in use in the state of Iowa
The Bellevue Elementary School, which once served as the county courthouse, may be the oldest school building still in use in the state of Iowa
A photo of the building around 1910 with trees and cupola.
A photo of the building around 1910 with trees and cupola.

Probably not too many local folks give it a second thought.    
They pick up their children or drop them off at the big brick building on the corner of Third and State Streets, which is the location of the Bellevue Elementary School.
According to local historians and school administrators, however, the old brick building has extreme historical significance.
First constructed in 1848 as the Jackson County Courthouse, a portion of the building was also used as a school at that time. This fact may make the structure the oldest active school building still in use in the state of Iowa.
While the building served as a county courthouse, it became the official K-12 school in 1861. Several additions were added over the years, but the original courthouse portion ha remained and has been in use now for 166 years.
Bellevue Superintendent Mike Healy, who will retire at the end of this school year, said one of his main goals during his time in Bellevue was to restore the original 1848 portion of the building, rather than seeing the district spend millions more building a new elementary school.

70 years later, Bellevue’s Reistroffer shares memories of Normandy invasion

LeRoy “Chris” Reistroffer of Bellevue, who received two Purple Hearts and numerous medals and honors for his service to the country during World War II as a soldier in the 82nd Airborne, recently reflected on the D-Day invasion of 1944.
LeRoy “Chris” Reistroffer of Bellevue, who received two Purple Hearts and numerous medals and honors for his service to the country during World War II as a soldier in the 82nd Airborne, recently reflected on the D-Day invasion of 1944.
Chris Reistroffer (at far left) is pictured here with fellow soldiers on his 19th birthday. He “liberated” the Nazi flag while behind enemy lines.
Chris Reistroffer (at far left) is pictured here with fellow soldiers on his 19th birthday. He “liberated” the Nazi flag while behind enemy lines.

After nearly 70 years, the memories and images are still fresh in LeRoy Reistroffer’s mind.
It was back in June of 1944, when the 19 year-old Bellevue youth was part of one of the most significant battles of World War II, which helped secure victory and freedom for the United States of America as well as Allied forces.
Now 89, Reistroffer recently shared his memories and experiences of WWII with his son and grandson, who recently came home to Bellevue for the holidays.
Just like the patriarch of the family, both are military men who served their country with honor. Son Jon Reistroffer, a 1985 graduate of Bellevue High School now living in Houston, Texas, served in the Marine Corps for 24 years and recently returned from a mission in Afghanistan. Grandson Brandon, age 20, recently joined the U.S. Marine Corps.
While they have their own experiences, LeRoy “Chris” Reistroffer was an integral part of the famous D-Day invasion on June 6 and June 7 of 1944, one of the most significant battles of World War II.
After graduating from St. Joseph’s Catholic High School in Bellevue in the spring of 1943 (it wasn’t called Marquette until later), Reistroffer immediately joined ... READ MORE BY PURCHASING AN E-EDITION.

National Country Artist to perform at annual event

Unique crucifix shines at Marquette's MEC

Chris and Kathie Lampe pose for a photo with the recently blessed, handcrafted crucifix now located in the gymnasium of the Marquette Education Center.
Chris and Kathie Lampe pose for a photo with the recently blessed, handcrafted crucifix now located in the gymnasium of the Marquette Education Center.

Marquette High School will have a special fan watching over Mohawk basketball games this winter.
A 9-foot tall 250-pound lighted crucifix, donated by Chris and Kathie Lampe of Bellevue, was blessed by Father Kruse of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church during Christmas Eve services Tuesday.
“This is an important symbol of the Church,” said Father Kruse of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church. “Therefore, before we put in use any such symbol or sign we bless it.”
The crucifix was carved by Jr. Cadawas of Chicago, who was born and raised in the Philippines amongst a community of carvers. He has honed his craft for over 40 years and today, his artworks are considered collector’s items.
“In the Fall of 2012, I was in the Xavier High School gymnasium in Cedar Rapids and I noticed a beautiful lighted crucifix on the wall,” explained Chris Lampe.  “On the drive home, I mentioned to my wife, Kathie, that I wasn’t even aware if Marquette High School had a crucifix in the gymnasium.  I decided that the MEC (Marquette Education Center) should have a crucifix to express that Marquette is a religious institution.” READ MORE BUY CLICKING ON E-EDITION AT RIGHT.

Sisters Pam (Spangler) Moriarty and Gemma (Spangler) Still are pictured here at their Spruce Creek home with their brother Peter Lana, who they met for the firsy time last Friday. Peter was put up for adoption in 1951 and never knew his natural family unt
Sisters Pam (Spangler) Moriarty and Gemma (Spangler) Still are pictured here at their Spruce Creek home with their brother Peter Lana, who they met for the firsy time last Friday. Peter was put up for adoption in 1951 and never knew his natural family unt

A Christmas Miracle in Bellevue

Two sisters from Bellevue were united with a brother they didn’t even know they had this past weekend. Pam Moriarty and sister Gemma Still who both live in the Spruce Creek addition north of town, met their newly found brother Peter Joseph Lana, for the first time when he flew into Dubuque last Friday night. “To me, it is a Christmas Miracle,” said Moriarty, who explained that her mother gave birth to her older brother when she was only 17 and gave him up for adoption. “She hadn’t told us about him because we were all too young. She died of cancer in 1982, and the secret sort of went with her.” Now age 62, Peter Lana was given to Catholic Charities and sent to an orphanage after he was born in April of 1951. He was the first of eight children born to Mary Elaine Steinhoff. She named him Robert Joseph Steinhoff, but his middle and last name would change when he was adopted by a several months later. READ THE ENTIRE STORY by picking up a copy of the Bellevue Herald-Leader or clicking on e-dition at right.

Bellevue’s Springside, built in 1848, will be open for holiday tours this Sunday. Now the family home of Dave and Penny North, the iconic structure is on the National Registry of Historic Places. All proceeds from the tour will go to defray medical costs
Bellevue’s Springside, built in 1848, will be open for holiday tours this Sunday. Now the family home of Dave and Penny North, the iconic structure is on the National Registry of Historic Places. All proceeds from the tour will go to defray medical costs

A Christmas Tour for Brittany

Bellevue’s iconic Springside home is once again glowing with the spirit of the Christmas. And so are owners Dave and Penny North, who are inviting the public to tour the unique eye-catching 165 year-old historic structure located on the north bluff on Sunday, Dec. 15 from 2 to 6 p.m. Donations from the tour will benefit Brittany Moore, who underwent a bone marrow transplant in Wisconsin this past summer. The daughter of Brian and Kimberly Moore, Brittany is a sophomore at Marquette Catholic in Bellevue and currently recovering from the surgery at home. The Norths came up with the idea of a tour to help the Moore family defray medical expenses. “The Moore’s are our friends and that’s what friends do,” said Penny North. As well as this weekend’s Springside Tour, other events and prayer vigils have taken place at Marquette High School since Moore was diagnosed with “aplastic anemia” in November of 2010. Aplastic anemia is basically a bone marrow disorder that occurs when a person’s white cells are unable to fight infection.

Naomi Kueter of the famous Mont Rest Bed and Breakfast in Bellevue was spotted last week decorating the business for this weekend’s Holiday Tour of Homes.
Naomi Kueter of the famous Mont Rest Bed and Breakfast in Bellevue was spotted last week decorating the business for this weekend’s Holiday Tour of Homes.

Unwrap the Magic of Christmas in Bellevue

The holiday season in Bellevue is officially here  – and the local Chamber of Commerce, in conjunction with Bellevue merchants, have big plans to put everyone in the Christmas spirit this weekend.
A holiday fireworks display, lighted Christmas parade, wagon rides with Santa, Firemen’s Chili Supper and a Holiday Tour of Homes are all on tap Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 30 through Dec. 1 as folks are invited to “Unwrap the Magic of Christmas” in Bellevue.
The Wonderland of Trees is also open at the Great River Gallery on Riverview Street and the weekend events will culminated there on Sunday with the annual tree raffle and reception following the tour of homes.
On Saturday, Nov. 30, a series of non-stop holiday events and shopping opportunities will take place. Special appearances by Santa Claus will include the annual Breakfast with Santa event on Saturday, Nov. 30 from 9 to 11 a.m. at Water Street Market; and
Wagon Rides with Santa from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Bob Ernst Building on Riverview.
Other events on Saturday include a Ceramics Workshop from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the art studio above the Happy Bean, a Holiday Craft and Vendor Fair from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Shore Events Centre on the north end of town and the annual Firemen’s Chili and Pie Supper from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Bellevue Fire Station.
A Holiday Craft and Vendor Fair will also take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Shore Event Centre in Bellevue.
The big finale for Saturday will be a Christmas Fireworks Display over the Mississippi River at approximately 6:15 p.m., which is sponsored by Lampe’s True Value Hardware,  followed by the annual Lighted Christmas Parade on Riverview.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30
• Breakfast with Santa 9-11 at  Water Street Market
• Ceramics Workshop 10-2 in the studio above Water Street Market
• Holiday Craft & Vendor Fair 10-4 at The Shore Event Centre
• Wagon Rides with Santa 1-3 p.m. at the Bob Ernst Building
• Firemen’s Chili & Pie Supper
4-8 at the Fire Station
• Fireworks at 6:15 followed by the Lighted Christmas Parade

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1
• Holiday Open House Tour 12-5
• Wonderland of Trees Reception and Raffle at the Great River Gallery 5-6

Dredging project underway at Spruce Harbor

Crews from Newt Marine of Dubuque were busy at Spruce Creek Harbor last week removing 3,000 cubic yards of material from the water bottom. The $90,000 dredging project will create a better habitat for fish during the winter and provide a better flow in th
Crews from Newt Marine of Dubuque were busy at Spruce Creek Harbor last week removing 3,000 cubic yards of material from the water bottom. The $90,000 dredging project will create a better habitat for fish during the winter and provide a better flow in th

Fish and fishermen alike will benefit greatly for years to come as a result of a water project currently underway at the north edge of Bellevue on the Mississippi River.
A $90,000 dredging project Spruce Creek Harbor, approved earlier this fall by the Jackson Country Conservation Board, will remove about 3,000 cubic yards of silt, soil and sludge from the bottom of the harbor, creating a better flow of water for boaters and easing flooding problems.
Perhaps more importantly, the project will be a major benefit to many species of fish during the winter months – which is the main goal of the project. READ MORE in this week's Herald-Leader. To purchase an online version, click on e-edition at right.

Feuerbach; Lawson and Heiar win election

Bellevue City Council incumbents Gary Feuerbach and Darla Lawson retained their seats in Tuesday’s municipal elections, while newcomer Jayson Heiar was also elected to one of the three open seats.

 

Feuerbach received the most votes with 279, while Lawson received 228.

 

Coming in with 227 votes was Heiar, who is employed as an officer with the Maquoketa Police Department.

 

Sabra Roling received 153 votes in the contest, while Bellevue Mayor Chris Roling came in last with 94.

 

All votes are unofficial until canvassed by the county. Look for officials results, comments and totals from all the races in eastern Jackson County in next week’s Herald-Leader.

 

John Bohy of Bellevue served two tours during the Korean War as a radio operator aboard the U.S.S. MacKenzie, a massive destroyer also known as “The Fighting Tin Can.”
John Bohy of Bellevue served two tours during the Korean War as a radio operator aboard the U.S.S. MacKenzie, a massive destroyer also known as “The Fighting Tin Can.”

Veterans Day to be observed in Bellevue

For 95 years, the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month has been a remembrance of those who served America in time of war.
But the original Nov. 11 Veterans Day commemoration began as a day to celebrate peace - the silencing of the guns of World War I, “The Great War,” which claimed the lives of more than 15 million soldiers and civilians.
On that day in 1918, at the 11th hour, Germany signed an armistice with the Allied Powers - including the U.S., France, Britain, Japan and Italy - ending major hostilities in a war that nearly wiped out a generation of men.
A full peace was concluded the next year in France at the Palace of Versailles, and the first Armistice Day was proclaimed and celebrated by President Woodrow Wilson on the anniversary of the ceasefire: Nov. 11, 1919.
Known today as Veterans Day, traditional observances and events are held in memory of those who served our country from across eastern Jackson County.
Veterans Day ceremonies, conducted by Bellevue American Legion Post #273, will be conducted on Monday. Nov. 11 at 10 a.m. in the Bellevue High School gymnasium.
Featured speakers will include a handful of Bellevue-area Korean War veterans who recently participated in the Honor Flight program to Washington D.C.
The schedule of events for the Veterans Day program, which will be attended by both Bellevue and Marquette students along with the general public, includes a patriotic performance by the Bellevue High School Band, the advancement of flags by the Post #273 Color Guard, the reciting of the Pledge of Allegiance and the traditional Armed Forces Salute by the Bellevue High School Band.
Opening remarks will be given by Post #273 veterans Leonard Ernst and John Bohy.

Hundreds of seagulls have been hunting for food at Lock and Dam 12 in Bellevue before migrating south for the winter. Here, a seagull comes in for a landing to join the rest of tbe group for a rest on the railings of the lock.
Hundreds of seagulls have been hunting for food at Lock and Dam 12 in Bellevue before migrating south for the winter. Here, a seagull comes in for a landing to join the rest of tbe group for a rest on the railings of the lock.

A Flock of Seagulls

The City of Bellevue has seen an influx of out-of-town tourists over the past few weeks.
They haven’t done a lot of shopping on Riverview, but they have spent a lot of time at the waters near Lock and Dam 12 catching fish and flying around over the Mississippi River.
Large flocks of seagulls, according to Lockmaster Bill Hainstock are not an unusual sight this time of year. He said the large birds will most likely be moving on in a few weeks and will be replaced by Eagles.

Contents of Brandt’s machine shop donated to Mississippi River Museum

The Prentiss, one of the biggest and perhaps the fanciest boat built at the former Iowa Marine and Launch Works in Bellevue was photographed here on front street prior to launch in the Mississippi River in 1915. (photos courtesy of the Brandt historical c
The Prentiss, one of the biggest and perhaps the fanciest boat built at the former Iowa Marine and Launch Works in Bellevue was photographed here on front street prior to launch in the Mississippi River in 1915. (photos courtesy of the Brandt historical c

 Bellevue century-old machine shop collection with a wealth of historical significance will be donated to the National Mississippi River Museum in Dubuque.
Jan Brinker, a first cousin to the late William Brandt (grandson of famous boat builder Joseph Brandt), has announced that the contents of the former Iowa Marine Engine and Launch Works building, located at 207 South Second Street, will be given to the national museum, which will build a separate display for the one-of-a-kind collection.
The building and its contents are extremely significant to Bellevue and the Mississippi River as the old limestone structure at the corner of Chestnut and South Second Street was the location where some of the first racing boat engines were built, and the location where the famous recording-breaking Red Top – which was the toast of racing boat enthusiasts from St. Louis to St. Paul in the early 1900s.
“We know there are people who wanted it to stay in here and be taken over by the Jackson County Historical Society, but we think this is the best way to pay tribute to the Brandt family ...

Farewell to a Riverboat Captain

A special memorial service for the late Terry Putman was conducted Sunday in Bellevue overlooking the river where the longtime Riverboat Captain and fisherman spent much of his life.
Bellevue American Legion Post #273 provided the traditional 21-gun salute for Putnam, who was a veteran of the Vietnam War, while the Tugboat River Rat floated below with flag at half-mast.
Putman, age 65 of Bellevue, passed away from cancer and on September 2, 2013. The special private service for family and friends celebrated his life in a unique way.
He was born September 30, 1947 in Bellevue, the son of Edward and Angeline Putman. In 1966 , he served in Vietnam, seeing action in some of the most important battles of the war.
Twice awarded Purple Heart, Putnam spent many months in the hospital recovering from his wounds.
After the war, he returned to Bellevue and spent the next 40 years raising a family, building businesses and fulfilling his life-long dream of becoming a Riverboat Captain and piloting tows on the inland waterways. After retiring from his many years on the river, the Putnam home would become the daily meeting place for a group of friends that would last for decades.

Full slate of candidates for Bellevue council

With the deadline now passed to file for this fall’s municipal elections, five candidates have emerged for three open seats on the Bellevue City Council.
Candidates who have filed papers to get on the Tuesday, Nov. 5 ballot include incumbents Gary Feuerbach and Darla Lawson, as well as newcomers Sabra Roling and Jayson Heiar. In a somewhat unique move, current Bellevue Mayor Chris Roling has also officially filed for one of the open council seats. READ MORE IN THIS WEEK'S HERALD-LEADER. (buy an e-edition or pick up a print edition today)

Mark Rogge, owner and lead mechanic at Bellevue’s Backwaters Bicycle Shop, works on one of his many Sun bicyles at his shop on South Second Street. The brand has been heralded for its unique and comforable “foot forward” design.
Mark Rogge, owner and lead mechanic at Bellevue’s Backwaters Bicycle Shop, works on one of his many Sun bicyles at his shop on South Second Street. The brand has been heralded for its unique and comforable “foot forward” design.

Backwaters Bicycle Shop brings 'em to Bellevue

When former Bellevue Mayor and longtime school administrator Virgil Murray took a test ride on a new bike from Backwaters Bicycle Shop a few years ago, he didn’t come back for over an hour and a half.
“I thought he stole it,” joked Mark Rogge, who has owned and operated the local bike shops now for about a decade. “But he came back with a huge smile and said it was the most comfortable bicycle he ever had the pleasure to ride  – now that’s a great testimonial.”
Backwaters Bicycle Shop, located at 305 and a half South Second Street not only made an impression on Murray, but on hundreds of other folks from Bellevue and across the states of Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota over the years. READ MORE IN THIS WEEK'S HERALD-LEADER ... click on e-edition at right.

American Queen locks through Bellevue

The massive steamboat known as the American Queen, with 370 passengers on board, rolled down the Mississippi River from Dubuque to Bellevue last Tuesday afternoon to lock through on its nine-day journey to the Port of St. Louis, Missouri.
The massive steamboat known as the American Queen, with 370 passengers on board, rolled down the Mississippi River from Dubuque to Bellevue last Tuesday afternoon to lock through on its nine-day journey to the Port of St. Louis, Missouri.

The massive steamboat known as the American Queen rolled down the Mississippi River from Dubuque to Bellevue last Tuesday afternoon to lock through on its nine-day journey to the Port of St. Louis, Missouri.
Lock and Dam #12 Lockmaster Bill Hainstock said the mighty paddle steamship, which was carrying 370 passengers, comes through Bellevue about twice each year and always turns a lot of heads.
On its journey through Bellevue, the music notes of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” wafted from the giant ship, and scores of passengers came out on deck to get a brief peek at Bellevue. Read this week's Herald-Leader for more photos and information or suscribe to an e-edition today.
 

Jackson County's own "Duck Dynasty"

Shannon Witt works on one of her many duck decoy creations at her home south of Bellevue,
Shannon Witt works on one of her many duck decoy creations at her home south of Bellevue,

What started with a defective duck decoy has turned into a new and unique home business for Shannon Witt and her family of rural Bellevue.
A middle school math and computer teacher at Andrew, Witt created “Kaotic Ducks,” and sold her first dozen creations at the arts show on the river during Bellevue’s Fishtival Celebration just three weeks ago.
Now she has store owners in LeClaire and Galena who want to sell her creatively painted duck decoys, and she also has custom-made orders for various customers around Jackson County.
It all started when Witt’s husband Darryn, a federal wildlife refuge officer on Upper Mississippi River .... READ MORE by subscribing to our e-edition at right)

Michels and his Magnificent Model T

Don and Dorothy Michels of Bellevue pose for a photo with their classic 1914 Model-T Ford.
Don and Dorothy Michels of Bellevue pose for a photo with their classic 1914 Model-T Ford.

Bellevue’s Don Michels said it’s going to be tough, but once she turns 100 years old, it’s time to let her go.
He’s talking about his 1914 Model T, (of course), which he has owned now for the past 25 years. Most around these parts have probably seen he and the car regularly over past three decades driving in parades and town celebrations across eastern Jackson County.
“I always said when she turns 100, I’m selling,” said Michels, who found the old Ford on a farm near Andrew back in 1979 and spent years restoring the old machine.  Read more on our e-edition ...